A Look Into Contemporary Ballet! Eglevsky Ballet - Long Island's Premier Ballet Academy

A Look Into Contemporary Ballet! Eglevsky Ballet - Long Island's Premier Ballet Academy

Dance is everywhere. Anywhere from hip hop, jazz, and ballet. Walking down the streets of New York you may see over ten different styles of dance. One of the most elegant that I have seen is contemporary ballet. This form of dance is like walking into an art gallery to see the fabulous pieces of art on the well. Only this time it is a gallery of dance with the center and most beautiful pieces being ballet. The real question is, what is contemporary ballet?

Who is Andre Eglevsky?

Who is Andre Eglevsky?

During the revolution in Russia, Eglevsky was born.  His mother saw true talent in him. She knew he would not have the opportunity to develop that talent under the new regime.  A decision had to be made. This decision changed Eglevsky’s life forever. At the age of 8, they left Russia and departed for France.  It felt like France would be the perfect location to begin his development. Granted, there was a huge community for Russia ballet and some of the top teachers and instructors.  At the age of 8, he found himself on a long and fulfilling journey as he studied with Maria Nevelskaya, who is formal of the Bolshoi Ballet, and several other great mentors and teachers.

Never Standing Still #BalletInTheCity

Never Standing Still #BalletInTheCity

“Design Army sketched every piece, and these sketches became our bible. We were juggling conversations with the choreographer, the director, stylists, music designers and prop stylists – and also in talks with the client on how to break through and do something bigger, to bring in humour, to push further in making this accessible.”

The Eglevsky Ballet and its very own professional ballet company is inspired by the video and looks forward to continuing being Long Island’s premier company. See us at our upcoming programs and shows!

Watch "Limelight" with Andre Eglevsky

Watch "Limelight" with Andre Eglevsky

The movie is set in London in 1914, on the eve of World War I (and the year Chaplin made his first film). Calvero (Charlie Chaplin), once a famous stage clown but now a washed-up drunk, saves a young dancer, Thereza "Terry" Ambrose (Claire Bloom), from a suicide attempt. Nursing her back to health, Calvero helps Terry regain her self-esteem and resume her dancing career. In doing so he regains his own self-confidence, but an attempt to make a comeback is met with failure. Terry says she wants to marry Calvero despite their age difference, although she has befriended Neville (Sydney Earl Chaplin), a young composer Calvero believes would be better suited to her. In order to give them a chance, Calvero leaves home and becomes a street entertainer. Terry, now starring in her own show, eventually finds Calvero and persuades him to return to the stage for a benefit concert. Reunited with an old partner (Buster Keaton), Calvero gives a triumphant comeback performance. He suffers a heart attack during a routine, however, and dies in the wings while watching Terry, the second act on the bill, dance on stage.

Michael Minn on Andre Eglevsky

Michael Minn on Andre Eglevsky

One of the many things I admired about Eglevsky was what a good father he was to his daughter and two sons. He never talked down to them, but treated them respectfully on their own level. Shortly after I stopped performing I started teaching children and used Eglevsky's technique as a model. Many of those "babies," now pushing 50, still keep in contact with me. Thanks André!

Learn About André Eglevsky

Learn About André Eglevsky

He danced with such companies as the René Blum–Michel Fokine Ballets de Monte Carlo, the American Ballet, and the Ballet (now American Ballet) Theatre before joining the New York City Ballet(1951–58), where he created leading roles in several George Balanchine ballets, including Scotch Symphony (1952) and Caracole (1952; now called Divertimento No15). Among his other well-known roles were Albrecht in Giselle and Prince Siegfried in Swan Lake; principal parts in Fokine’s ballets Les Sylphides, Prince Igor, Le Spectre de la Rose, and Petrushka; the burlesque Paris in David Lichine’s Helen of Troy; and the title role of Léonide Massine’s surrealistic Mad Tristan. Eglevsky, a U.S. citizen from 1937, established a school and small performing group in Massapequa, N.Y., in 1958, which grew into the Eglevsky Ballet Company that survived him.